You can choose to listen to the audio version here or you can read the devotional below. Enjoy!

Click Here to learn more about the Holy Land and Megiddo with one of our seminars.

Megiddo JosiahYou may not know it, but Josiah is quite possibly one of the greatest kings in this history of Judah. Though Hezekiah may get more “air time,” as it were, Josiah was one of the greatest reformers of all the kings of Judah and Israel combined. In 2016 I actually wrote a seminar paper (25 pages) on the Theology of Divine Punishment in the Life and Death of Josiah. In this paper I analyze the life and death of the great reformer and if Josiah’s death was a result of divine punishment.

Megiddo is the birthplace of the first recorded battle in history. It’s ironic that this is also the death place of King Josiah, and relatively close to the death of Megiddo as a city. But why? When Josiah heard the scriptures read, he tore his clothes, made reforms, and renewed Israel’s covenant with God (1 Kings 22). In stark contrast to the previous king we’ve discussed at Megiddo, Ahab, Josiah was a righteous king who sought to follow the ways of God. He did everything in his power to ensure that Judah followed the commandments of God, yet still, he died too early. How do we reconcile a horrible death with a good king?

Let’s be honest, bad things happen to good people and good things happen to bad people. Jesus says in Matthew 5:45 that the sun shines and rains fall on the wicked and the righteous. For a full discourse on Josiah’s actions and why he was at Megiddo in the first place, you can read here. As with Job, we cannot always understand why God allows bad things to happen to good people, including those who follow Him. We may never know in this lifetime. Our job, however, is not to judge God but to follow him in spite of our circumstances. To bless and worship God rather than curse Him. And this isn’t always easy to do.

The story of Josiah was likely written many years after the Judeans were exiled into Babylon. In my paper, I ask, “Why write so highly of Josiah if he just goes and throws it all away with the Egyptian Pharaoh Necho?” The reason is that Josiah is an archetype king. His death, albeit unfortunate and premature, didn’t preclude the author of Kings and Chronicles from telling a story about one of the greatest kings in Israelite history.

As King, Josiah not only heard the scriptures, He acted on them and put them into practice. For us today, Josiah is not only an Israelite archetype king, he’s a role model for how scripture should penetrate our lives. But we mustn’t be hasty to run to battle either. For Josiah, his hastiness resulted in his death. And that is also the hapless story of Megiddo as a whole. Megiddo – the place of the first recorded battle in history – is also set to be the place of the final battle in history…or is it? You can read that article here.

Today, I challenge you to hear the words of scripture, put them into practice in your life, let them penetrate your soul, and be patient for what the Lord wants to do. Don’t rush into something God hasn’t allowed or wanted for you. Instead, allow your mind to be transformed and renewed through prayer, scripture, and seeking wise counsel, so that you may walk on the path God has for you (Romans 12).

Click Here to learn more about the Holy Land and Megiddo with one of our seminars.

You may not know it, but Josiah is quite possibly one of the greatest kings in this history of Judah. Though Hezekiah may get more “air time,” as it were, Josiah was one of the greatest reformers of all the kings of Judah and Israel combined. In 2016 I actually wrote a seminar paper (25 pages) on the Theology of Divine Punishment in the Life and Death of Josiah. In this paper I analyze the life and death of the great reformer and if Josiah’s death was a result of divine punishment.

Megiddo is the birthplace of the first recorded battle in history. It’s ironic that this is also the death place of King Josiah, and relatively close to the death of Megiddo as a city. But why? When Josiah heard the scriptures read, he tore his clothes, made reforms, and renewed Israel’s covenant with God (1 Kings 22). In stark contrast to the previous king we’ve discussed at Megiddo, Ahab, Josiah was a righteous king who sought to follow the ways of God. He did everything in his power to ensure that Judah followed the commandments of God, yet still, he died too early. How do we reconcile a horrible death with a good king?

Let’s be honest, bad things happen to good people and good things happen to bad people. Jesus says in Matthew 5:45 that the sun shines and rains fall on the wicked and the righteous. For a full discourse on Josiah’s actions and why he was at Megiddo in the first place, you can read here. As with Job, we cannot always understand why God allows bad things to happen to good people, including those who follow Him. We may never know in this lifetime. Our job, however, is not to judge God but to follow him in spite of our circumstances. To bless and worship God rather than curse Him. And this isn’t always easy to do.

The story of Josiah was likely written many years after the Judeans were exiled into Babylon. In my paper, I ask, “Why write so highly of Josiah if he just goes and throws it all away with the Egyptian Pharaoh Necho?” The reason is that Josiah is an archetype king. His death, albeit unfortunate and premature, didn’t preclude the author of Kings and Chronicles from telling a story about one of the greatest kings in Israelite history.

As King, Josiah not only heard the scriptures, He acted on them and put them into practice. For us today, Josiah is not only an Israelite archetype king, he’s a role model for how scripture should penetrate our lives. But we mustn’t be hasty to run to battle either. For Josiah, his hastiness resulted in his death. And that is also the hapless story of Megiddo as a whole. Megiddo – the place of the first recorded battle in history – is also set to be the place of the final battle in history…or is it? You can read that article here.

Today, I challenge you to hear the words of scripture, put them into practice in your life, let them penetrate your soul, and be patient for what the Lord wants to do. Don’t rush into something God hasn’t allowed or wanted for you. Instead, allow your mind to be transformed and renewed through prayer, scripture, and seeking wise counsel, so that you may walk on the path God has for you (Romans 12).

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