Click Here to learn more about the Holy Land and Ahab at Megiddo with one of our seminars.

Megiddo Ahab Well StairsAt the site of Megiddo, you get to see some of the incredible advancements King Ahab made to the tel. Ahab was an active king who wanted to ensure the survival of his city and built a water system on the inside of the wall in order to overcome any siege that would be laid against his city. However, eventually, Megiddo would fall to Tiglath-Pileser III and the Assyrians in 721 and was used as an administrative center until 586. The amazing thing about Megiddo is that since it’s abandonment in 586, it was left virtually untouched until modern times allowing archaeologists to have a “field day” with findings there. 

The tunnel/water system built by Ahab was certainly impressive. Yet, despite his efforts to build a great city, and much like Herod the Great, Ahab was a man who didn’t care to obey the commandments of God. There’s no doubt Ahab wanted to be known for being a great king who built a great city. Instead, history comes to know Ahab as a wicked king who not only married Jezebel but was compliant in the massacre of God’s prophets.

In addition to the massacre, 1 Kings 21 reveals the true nature of Ahab. After his failed pursuit of a local vineyard owned by Naboth, Ahab goes home and throws a temper tantrum like a child who didn’t get candy. He was so pouty, in fact, that 1 Kings 21:4 records Jezebel asking him why he refuses to eat. In his weakness, Ahab allows himself to be a manipulated King and permits Jezebel to slander and ultimately indirectly kill Naboth, simply because Naboth refused to hand over his vineyard.

The most important thing we can learn from Ahab is that getting what we want in the present doesn’t guarantee we’ll get what we want in the future. Acquiring Naboth’s vineyard seemed great at the moment. However, it left Ahab with a legacy of: “Ahab son of Omri did more evil in the eyes of the LORD than any of those before him.” Like Herod the Great, we can do all these impressive things in the present, but if we choose to do things our way and allow the world corrupt our hearts, our legacy and our eternity will be tarnished.

Today I challenge you to be patient. Seek the Lord, seek wisdom and wise counsel from those you trust. Ask how you can serve the Lord and your neighbors better this week. What are some things you really want right now that maybe God is saying, “Not yet” to? Don’t allow impatience and a short temper ruin your week, or better yet, your legacy!

Click Here to learn more about the Holy Land and Ahab at Megiddo with one of our seminars.

At the site of Megiddo, you get to see some of the incredible advancements King Ahab made to the tel. Ahab was an active king who wanted to ensure the survival of his city and built a water system on the inside of the wall in order to overcome any siege that would be laid against his city.However, eventually, Megiddo would fall to Tiglath-Pileser III and the Assyrians in 721 and was used as an administrative center until 586. The amazing thing about Megiddo is that since it’s abandonment in 586, it was left virtually untouched until modern times allowing archaeologists to have a “field day” with findings there. 

The tunnel/water system built by Ahab was certainly impressive. Yet, despite his efforts to build a great city, and much like Herod the Great, Ahab was a man who didn’t care to obey the commandments of God. There’s no doubt Ahab wanted to be known for being a great king who built a great city. Instead, history comes to know Ahab as a wicked king who not only married Jezebel but was compliant in the massacre of God’s prophets.

In addition to the massacre, 1 Kings 21 reveals the true nature of Ahab. After his failed pursuit of a local vineyard owned by Naboth, Ahab goes home and throws a temper tantrum like a child who didn’t get candy. He was so pouty, in fact, that 1 Kings 21:4 records Jezebel asking him why he refuses to eat. In his weakness, Ahab allows himself to be a manipulated King and permits Jezebel to slander and ultimately indirectly kill Naboth, simply because Naboth refused to hand over his vineyard.

The most important thing we can learn from Ahab is that getting what we want in the present doesn’t guarantee we’ll get what we want in the future. Acquiring Naboth’s vineyard seemed great at the moment. However, it left Ahab with a legacy of: “Ahab son of Omri did more evil in the eyes of the LORD than any of those before him.” Like Herod the Great, we can do all these impressive things in the present, but if we choose to do things our way and allow the world corrupt our hearts, our legacy and our eternity will be tarnished.

Today I challenge you to be patient. Seek the Lord, seek wisdom and wise counsel from those you trust. Ask how you can serve the Lord and your neighbors better this week. What are some things you really want right now that maybe God is saying, “Not yet” to? Don’t allow impatience and a short temper ruin your week, or better yet, your legacy!

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